Quote of the day

“I’m not a really good writer, and I’m okay with that. What I do have is this ability to dissect my emotions and feelings, and write about my deepest secrets, about what terrifies me, about what I hate.” Cristian Mihai 

Now one could counter that the ability to capture your deepest secrets and fears with words is the definition of good writing.

Consider H.P. Lovecraft. His characterization and dialogue could be laughably bad, but his ability to construct scenarios and concepts that thrilled and challenged readers made him a giant among fantasy and horror writers.

Bottom line: We can’t be good at every aspect of life, or even good at every aspect of our chosen craft, but we can focus on what we love and make the most of what we have.

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4 thoughts on “Quote of the day”

  1. Vincent Van Gogh had an interesting take on how to use the shortcomings in his art. He wanted to use them as part of his expressive power.
    Van Gogh said “My great longing is to make those very incorrectnesses, those deviations, remodellings, changes in reality, so that they may become, yes, lies if you like – but truer than the literal truth.”
    It takes quite a will to transform a weakness into a strength.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Richard,

    Indeed. Arthur Marx failed at various jobs. He tried vaudeville, but couldn’t dance or memorize lines. So he created a mute character and adopted the stage name Harpo.

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  3. For the most part I go back and read things I’ve written and think “I could have done a lot better.” That feeling of failure has at various times kept me from writing or blogging for long periods. Most successful writers struggle with their writing because they’re usually perfectionists. And most of them, if they want to continue to write, eventually learn that perfection is an illusion. You write and craft sentences and tell stories because you want to, because it’s a passion you have, it’s an aesthetic experience you enjoy. At some point writing is an act of faith. We do it believing that what we do, while not perfect, is an act reverence for the power of words and the belief that what we do matters in some way to someone.

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