Tag Archives: writing

Quote of the day

Picture by David Shankbone

“In order to be clear it is necessary to at least consider the possibility that we actually may not be. It requires stepping outside of one’s self, reading a sentence as if we were another person (not us) who didn’t understand, and even sort of admire the newly minted gold on the screen or the page. It requires a kind of humility, an ability not to take everything personally and to separate ourselves from our work. Clarity is not only a literary quality but a spiritual one, involving, as it does, compassion for the reader.” Francine Prose

For more thoughts on the social value of literature, see here and here.

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Best fiction and writing blogs

Laura Ingalls Wilder

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary pioneer. Compiled by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

K. M. WeilandWriting as the Art of Thinking Clearly: 6 Steps
Hamilton PerezHow to Give Up Writing and Other Bad Habits
Tamara DrazicOutlining
D. Wallace PeachMy Bossy Muse
Nicola AlterKnocking People Out: Easier in Fiction Than In Real Life
Didi OviattThe Why #amwriting
Jacqui MurraySeries or Not a Series–How do You know?
J. C. Wolfe3 Pieces of Advice No Writer Should Ever Forget

… and a special bonus!

Adam RoweScience Fiction And Fantasy Book Sales Have Doubled Since 2010

Patience Is A Virtue

Patience is indeed a mindset you MUST develop if you’re going to write. Love the Rousseau quote, “Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.”

Evie Gaughan

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There are many skills that an author needs to learn in this business of pub, patience being the most important.  Patience with yourself, as the magical story in your head makes its way stumbling and lurching onto the page with all the grace and skill of a toddler.  Patience with the world when it doesn’t immediately recognise your brilliance.  Patience with agents and publishers while you await their response to your submission.  And now, for me, a new kind of patience while I wait for my book to be released.

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The advance reader copies have been sent out and happily, joyously, wondrously, the feedback is good 🙂  Editors and publications have been contacted, copy sent in.  The blog tour has been arranged.  And as we speak, my book (along with those of my fellow Urbanites) are being showcased at The London Book Fair.  THE LONDON BOOK FAIR!

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As Jean-Jacques Rousseau…

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Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

Jack London

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary swashbuckler. Inspired by jack.

Jean M. CogdellWrite like a professional – get the chapters right
Sarah A. HoytWriting About Death
James Harrington Character Creation
Brenda Davis HarshamTop Ten Blogging Rules
D. E. HaggertyHow to get the writing done despite distractions
Cristian MihaiBuilding a personal brand as an artist
M. L. S. WeechWhy some covers just don’t look right
Nic Schuck Getting testimonials

WHAT MAKES SOMEONE A BAD WRITER?

It’s a simple concept that takes a lot of love and effort to make it work: Read. Write. Repeat.

Behind The Tinted Glass

What makes someone a bad writer? To reply to that question, first I have to say that there is no perfect writer. Everyone improves with experience. Experience is one of the key things that makes someone a good writer. Every writer needs to be aware of the fact that everyone makes mistakes, but that doesn’t mean someone is a bad writer. There are three key things that make someone a bad writer:
behindthetintedglass badwriter nowriter
Source: Stocksnap.io
  • You don’t write much or you don’t write at all. That’s bad. Why? Let’s say someone wants to become a great athlete and win some big competition. He or she can’t do that if they don’t train. The same is with the writers. You have to put words on paper as much as you can. Practice. Write, write, write! Even if you think your text sucks. You’ll edit later. If you can, try to write at…

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Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

Ernest Hemingway

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary heavyweight. Inspired by ernie.

P. S. Hoffman3 Vital Keys to Every Great Horror Story
Kendra BoersenRevision, With A Side Of Existential Crisis
Emily Raper5 Misconceptions About Writers
Annika PerryWrite From Your Heart
Lionelson Norbert YongWhy I Chose Fantasy As My Genre
E. Michael HelmsSense and Sensibility [Not what you think!]
D. Wallace PeachThe Word Police
Ernest HemingwayHow to Write Fiction

Mickey Spillane’s Work Keeps Coming 12 Years After His Death

Mickey Spillane

I say it’s high time Mickey Spillane received proper appreciation for his raw, visual writing. Certain critics turn their noses up at him — still — but his work nevertheless continues to attract new legions of readers every generation. Maybe they see something the so-called critics don’t. From The Passive Voice:

Mickey Spillane was never adored by critics. He famously said that his own father called his work “crud.” For the mystery novelist, none of it mattered.

“I don’t have fans,” he said in a 1981 People magazine interview. “I have customers. I’m a writer. I give ’em what they wanna read.”

He died in 2006 at 88, but his work hasn’t stopped. In the past 12 years, his estate has released nearly 20 of his unpublished and previously uncompleted novels and short stories, some as graphic novels and audio plays, many of them featuring the hard-boiled private eye he created, Mike Hammer.

Mickey Spillane has long been a favorite of mine, and definitely exerted a deep influence on my writing. Few authors can match his mastery of first person pov. Jim Traylor, Spillane’s biographer, said this about Spillane’s rough-and-tumble prose: “It’s not very highbrow, but it’s very real. It’s very Old Testament. It’s eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth.”

And riveting. Not only did Spillane produce entertaining tales that still lure enthusiastic readers, but the brash new author who penned I, the Jury grew as an artist. As novelist Max Allan Collins once noted, Spillane made the leap from “brilliant primitive” to “polished professional” over his long career. In 1995, he won the Edgar Allen Poe Grand Master Award for mystery writing, which over the years has also recognized Raymond Chandler, John le Carré, and Elmore Leonard. Pretty good company for a writer so many have dismissed as a hack.