Category Archives: Writing

Jamaica Kincaid on How to Live and How to Write

Jamaica Kincaid

I must confess I am not familiar with Jamaica Kincaid or her works, but this collection of her quotes in Literary Hub makes me hunger for more. Here’s a small sample:

  • A professional writer is a joke. You write because you can’t do anything else, and then you have another job. I’m always telling my students go to law school or become a doctor, do something, and then write. First of all you should have something to write about, and you only have something to write about if you do something.
  • Life has a truth to it, and it’s complicated—it’s love and it’s hatred. Love and hatred don’t take turns; they exist side by side at the same time. And one’s duty, one’s obligation every day, is to choose to follow the nobler one.
  • I want to write until I die, and I hope to live a long time. I don’t want to reach a plateau; what I am interested in is living, living.

Ha! Love it. Want to read more? Check out the rest at Literary Hub.

Author Interviews with Cathleen Townsend

Author interviews

Cathleen Townsend’s Author Interviews is a respected online treasure. I’m honored to be included in the company of Dan Alatorre, D. Wallace Peach, and E. E. Rawls, just to name a few of the authors Cathleen has featured over the years.

Frankly, I had to dig deep to answer some of her questions, which revealed genuine insight and appreciation for the writing process. Cathleen asked me about projects that took me out of my comfort zone, my writing heroes, and about my latest book, The Genie Hunt. Here’s Cathleen Townsend’s Interview with M. C. Tuggle.

Traits Writers Have in Common – What I Learned from an Author Panel

I instantly recognized myself in K.L. Kranes’s post on the writing life and knew I had to share it.

K.L. Kranes, Author

20170505_105907_20170505111212159On Saturday I participated in my first author panel with a fellow local writer in the Northern Virginia area, Angela Glascock (Locksmith at the End of the Worldand moderated by another local writer, Lisa Tully.

Author panels are meant to give the audience insight on novels, authors and the writing process. But, I learned a few things too, including it seems as though we writers have a lot in common.

Here are some of the commonalities I noticed.

We wrote as children, all the time

As a kid, I remember writing all the time. I filled notebooks with stories and poems. They’d be stuff in drawers and boxes. When we’d clean out my room they’d turn up in random places. It was even an activity with my friends. While other kids were playing with toys or riding bikes, I’d rather be writing a book. Lucky for me I…

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Best fiction and writing blogs

Flannery O'Connor

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary legend. Compiled by flannery.

D. Wallace PeachWriters’ Critique Groups
Cathleen TownsendPinterest–Tips to Get Started
Sean P. CarlinFoundations of Storytelling: The Logline
Annabelle TroyFiction Gets Brainy
Dave AstorIt’s Earth Day in Some Parts of Literature
Nicola AlterGetting The Last Line
J. C. Wolfe16 Redundant Phrases You Should Simplify in Your Writing
Jay Dee ArcherGenres Helping Other Genres

Nattering About Novel Names

Here’s Dave Astor on one of the most important decisions an author must make.

Dave Astor on Literature

Book titles! They’re important, and the best of them can be quite memorable.

Some titles say a lot about what’s in the novels, as do War and Peace and Crime and Punishment in summarizing Leo Tolstoy’s and Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s respective masterpieces. Others tease you with their intriguing nature (many examples a few paragraphs below).

Titles can be funny, serious, long, short, evocative, descriptive, clever, slangy, punny, and more. They can be drawn from unforgettable phrases in the earlier works of other authors. They can just be the name of a place (as with Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, Henry James’ Washington Square, and many of James Michener’s novels). Or they can include the year in which the novel is set (witness George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Stephen King’s 11/22/63, and Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey). Or the name of the protagonist, or a description of the…

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Best fiction and writing blogs

Jack London
The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary adventurer. Compiled by jack.

Ed A. MurrayWhere I find my inspiration to write
Alicia GaileAdding Flavor To Your Characters
Lissa PelzerTop 5 Writing Tips
J. McSpaddenThe Word Magician, the Story Wizard
Melissa TriplettFinding and Organizing Your Story Ideas
Sonyo EstavilloFocusing on the right details
Didi OviattFocusing on content over word count
Jan M. FlynnAvoiding the Draft
Sy & JeiSy & Jei’s Five Writing Tips