Category Archives: Raymond Chandler

Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

Raymond Chandler

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary cult figure. Compiled by ray.

J. C. Wolfe6 Popular Rhetorical Devices and How to Use Them
Danielle MohlmanSpotlight on War Poets
Jacqui Murray12 Surprises I Found Marketing My Debut Novel
Melissa TriplettMy Editor. I Have One of Those.
Erin Beth LilesEvocation: Bringing Your Reader into the Story
Stacey LanierWhat is enchantment?
James A. ConanWriting Coherent and Interesting Magical Systems
PenstrickenFleshing out your story idea

Quote of the day

Raymond Chandler

“There are two kinds of truth: the truth that lights the way and the truth that warms the heart. The first of these is science, and the second is art. Neither is independent of the other or more important than the other. Without art science would be as useless as a pair of high forceps in the hands of a plumber. Without science art would become a crude mess of folklore and emotional quackery. The truth of art keeps science from becoming inhuman, and the truth of science keeps art from becoming ridiculous.” – Raymond Chandler

Best Fiction And Writing Blogs

Raymond Chandler

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, with advice and inspiration guaranteed to make you a literary legend. Compiled by ray.

A. J.HumpageThe Writer’s Essential Checklist
Nicola AlterGreat Books About Writing
Andrew Heisel – In Search of the Novel’s First Sentence
Becca PuglisiHow (and Why) to Write a Logline For Your Story
James Scott BellWho Are You Trying To Delight?
Abbie LuBook Door Lookbook A project both your inner bibliophile and supervillain will love.
Raymond ChandlerTen Commandments for Writing a Detective Novel

Raymond Chandler Didn’t Care About Plot

Raymond Chandler

I’ve always found Raymond Chandler’s writing to be inspirational, sublime, and maddening. I have no idea how many times I’ve read Farewell, My Lovely, and there’s still a lot about it I just don’t get. The work is an adventure tale, a work of art, and a puzzle. Chandler broke a lot of rules. But I, and countless other fans, keep coming back.

This retrospective on Chandler’s unique approach in Literary Hub echoes my feelings toward this gifted and driven artist:

Looking at Chandler’s work in retrospect, it seems fair to say that he wasn’t really a “mystery writer”—or not first and foremost. Plots didn’t interest him much. They were just pegs on which to hang characters and language. His plots were not particularly original but that never bothered him. “Very likely Agatha Christie and Rex Stout write better mysteries. But their words don’t get up and walk. Mine do.” And: “I don’t care whether the mystery is fairly obvious but I do care about the people, about this strange, corrupt world we live in and how any man who tries to be honest looks in the end either sentimental or just plain foolish.”

Story construction and the tying up of loose ends never bothered him. When director Howard Hawks was filming The Big Sleep, he cabled Chandler: “Who killed the chauffeur?” Chandler cabled back: “No idea.”

When he himself collaborated with the young Billy Wilder on what was Chandler’s first Hollywood film, Double Indemnity, Wilder observed that “Chandler was a dilettante. He did not like the structure of a screenplay… He was a mess but he could write a beautiful sentence. ‘There is nothing as empty as an empty swimming pool.’ That is a great line.” He would later give his moody one-time partner credit for being “one of the greatest creative minds I’ve ever encountered.”

I think Chandler’s face reflects the purposeful rebellion and probing intelligence one senses behind the writer’s challenging and endlessly intriguing fiction.

Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

JeffnBev
The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary rock star. Compiled by the dude.

James Scott Bell: Where Do You Get Your Ideas?
Stephen King: Everything you need to know to write successfully
Bob Mayer: What is your process as a writer?
Sue Vincent: How to make a living as a writer
Jacqueline Seewald: How to overcome writer’s block
Jeff Wills: Finding your style
A.D. Martin: Symbolism in novels
Lincoln Michel: Literary Links from Around the Web