Category Archives: Lovecraft

The Great KOA Getaway

The Great KOA Getaway

There’s an energizing crispness in the October air – and that’s not all. Regional festivals celebrating local wine, apples, and barbecue lure excited crowds with sweet, smoky aromas and music from homegrown bands. The squawking from a wedge of geese overhead reminds us it’s hunting and camping season. And Halloween is just around the corner.

My latest work, “The Great KOA Getaway,” should get you in the mood. It’s a flash story about an unlucky/lucky ranger caught in the middle of a little misunderstanding at a remote campground. I’d describe it as a mash-up of Twilight Zone and National Lampoon’s Vacation, with just a touch of Lovecraft thrown in. It’s available free (!) at The Flash Fiction Press.

I’ve always enjoyed stories that tickle your goosebumps and funny bone at the same time. And isn’t that what makes Halloween so much fun?

I hope “The Great KOA Getaway” brings a shiver and a smile to your day.

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Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

Lovecraft

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, with advice and inspiration guaranteed to make you a literary cult figure. Compiled by howard.

Joanne Jeffries and Julian YanoverPoetic WordClouds: These are the most common words in Poetry
Owen Booth24 Rules for Writing Short Stories
Fionn GrantLiterary Agent: Another Step Toward Writer Status
Jami GoldWhat Goes into Building a Movie in Our Mind?
Aerogramme Writers’ StudioOpportunities for Writers: June and July 2016
A.J. HumpageGetting Your Story To Flow
Krishna Prasad Is Poetry Dead?
PenstrickenThe (Im)perfect Protagonist
H. P. Lovecraft11 Tips for Novice Writers

“Rowdy” Roddy Piper Versus Cthulhu!

Portal to Hell!

This evening, The Charlotte Film Society featured two shorts and a full-length film. My wife and I agreed the main film, Nina Forever, was an unfocused hot mess. However, the short Portal to Hell!!! was a blast.

Ex-pro wrestler Roddy Piper plays Jack, a patient, over-worked, and under-appreciated building super. Jack’s so stressed by his job that he ignores a lady who’s obviously interested in him. One day, while checking out a power loss in the old building’s creepy basement, he discovers that two elderly male tenants dressed in tighty whities have invoked none other than the dreaded Cthulhu from his undersea hideout in R’lyeh. Jack just wants to do his job, but he’s pretty sure the men’s actions violate their lease, and doesn’t hesitate to tell them.

The Old One, being who he is, strikes out from his portal and kills everyone in his reach, then wraps a tentacle around Jack and s-l-o-w-l-y drags our hero toward certain doom. But the lady who has a secret crush on Jack finds the book the old men used to summon Cthulhu. Will she find the correct spell in time? And is that spell permanent or just a temporary fix?

Great special effects, great acting, lots of laughs, and plenty of hidden treasures for Lovecraft fans.

One sad note: Roddy Piper passed away shortly before the film was nominated for the Toronto International Film Festival.

Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

LovecraftThe best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, with advice and inspiration guaranteed to make you a literary sensation. Compiled by lovecraft.

Alice OsbornHow to Set Better Boundaries
A. J. Humpage Why Character Actions/Reactions Are Important
Angela AckermanKiller Resources for Drafting Our Story
Jonathon SturgeonAn Introduction to Cosmic Horror (Wait – Lovecraft again?) Oh, yes.
James Scott BellThe Power of Voice
Jordan DaneAdding Depth to Your Fictional Relationships
Charlie AndersThe Philosophical Roots of Science Fiction

H.P. Lovecraft, please call your office

Moa Claw

From Ancient Origins: The Frightening Discovery of the Mount Owen Claw

Nearly three decades ago, a team of archaeologists were carrying out an expedition inside a large cave system on Mount Owen in New Zealand when they stumbled across a frightening and unusual object. With little visibility in the dark cave, they wondered whether their eyes were deceiving them, as they could not fathom what lay before them—an enormous, dinosaur-like claw still intact with flesh and scaly skin. The claw was so well-preserved that it appeared to have come from something that had only died very recently.

Read the rest at Ancient Origins – if you dare.

If I’d discovered that claw, I would have set new land speed records skedaddling out of the cave.

Best Fiction and Writing Blogs

Lovecraft

The best fiction and writing blog posts from around the ‘net, all guaranteed to make you a literary cult figure. Compiled by lovecraft

Alice OsbornHow the Right Kind of Criticism Makes You Grow
Rick LaiThe Foundations of “The King In Yellow” and “The Necronomicon”
Steven Ramirez Writers, Start Building Your Brand Early!
The Book BloggerThe New Fatherland?
A.D. Martin 10 Tips For Better Writing!
Fergus McCartanInterview with Age of Iron author Angus Watson
PurpleanaisThe Night Owl and Tolkien
Nurse KellyBe The Peace
Once Upon A Time Living in Fairy Tales

Cthulhu in Foxholes?

My wife and I went to the Sensoria Celebration of the Arts Festival at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte yesterday. We thoroughly enjoyed Molly Manning’s presentation on her latest book, When Books Went to War, which tells the story of the massive and successful effort to provide desperately needed books to America’s fighting men during WW II.

In 1943, the War Department and the publishing industry devised a simple and brilliant plan to provide reading material to millions of men in the U.S. armed forces. The first step was to study standard issue military uniforms and determine the appropriate size for a book that would be easy to carry yet still readable. The end result was the Armed Services Edition book, which was smaller and much lighter than a standard hardbound book. Here’s a picture of some on display at the CPCC library:

ASEBooks
Click to enlarge

Funny thing, I noticed a copy of Lovecraft’s The Dunwich Horror, and decided I had to sneak a picture. But while I was there, I did not notice the letter beside it. I was delighted when I downloaded the picture to my laptop and read it. Here’s my transcription:


2-16-46

Gentlemen,

My brother, now serving in the occupational army in Germany, asked me to see if I could secure for him through you the following special editions for soldiers:

Max Beerbohm “Seven Men”
H.P. Lovecraft Anthology
Algernon Blackwood Anthology

He writes that these small volumes have been published by you and he is extremely interested in them but cannot locate them in the vicinity; if possible he would like to own them. He says I couldn’t send a nicer gift as far as books are concerned than those three little books.

Your help would be much appreciated. I would be happy to cover expenses.

Sincerely yours,

Dr. A.C. Klay

That gives you an idea of just how important great stories are to morale. And it suggests the depth of Lovecraft’s appeal.

120 million of these little books went to both the European and Pacific theaters, where they were devoured by eager, grateful GIs. These books introduced a lot of young men to literature, and boosted the careers of Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. They also made possible the paperback book industry that followed the war. Paperbacks were revolutionary. They were the eBooks of their time. (And I like eBooks!)

Wouldn’t you love to have a copy of that ASE edition of the Lovecraft anthology? Wow.